Sunday, April 8, 2012

Houston, We Are Go For Launch

Can you tell I'm one of those long-suffering, space-program documentary wives?

People, I am very thrilled to tell you I have a workable pattern. Too weary to jump up and down, but inestimably grateful that I didn't give up, and largely because of the help, good vibes and encouraging comments I have received lo these past 2 weeks. Hasn't it been longer than 2 weeks?

Anyway, below I present muslin 8 - but I warn you that it's only the right side (my right side) you want to pay attention to. I used the left side to diminish the seam allowance - to see if it would improve the fit. I was afraid I'd forgotten to reflect seam allowance in the final pattern pieces I'd (natch) already cut. That was the anxiety I awoke with this morning... It appears I did not, because the right side of the jacket definitely fits better than the (seam allowance-diminished) left side.

Here I make it easy for you to keep your eye on the right side - I've cropped the left one...

Keep in mind that I inserted the shoulder pad quickly - and it's got too much fabric along the top of the shoulder - I'll have to alter it slightly for fit but I don't want to start fooling around with it to fit the muslin. I want it to fit the finished jacket. I also shortened the sleeve so as not to have to deal with the dart etc. I was only considering the sleeve head on this round...

I'm not lopsided. I've got a whole different seam allowance happening on the left side of the jacket.

I realize that it's not perfect but you have to consider the following:
  • I'm working in a very stiff and heavy muslin (all I've got left). It's not going to drape like my fashion fabric - especially once it has a slippery lining on the inside.
  • The shoulder pads need some work.
  • I'm ok with this fit. It may not be the world's best, but I think it's the best I'm going to get without a fashion design degree, at my current level of experience, with a pattern that started off extremely unsuited to my dimensions.

I've hit fit fatigue - and I'm seriously worried about totally over fitting this in a fabric that isn't even vaguely like my fashion fabric. Drag lines happen. It's a function of the requirement for ease that permits movement. Apparently, on suits, we call the drag lines drape. Go figure.

I think, in the online sewing community, we're nearing a point of such anxiety about "wrinkles" that we're in danger of removing the ones required to allow us to move gracefully. At least that's what I'm telling myself.

But never mind me, what do you think of drag lines (the good ones, the bad ones, the necessary ones)? Are they all bad, in your mind? What do you think of this muslin? Note: I am very sensitive at this juncture - so please express your true feelings with care :-)


40 comments:

  1. I think it looks pretty good and I applaud your patience and perseverance with this. I don't know if I would have it. I think this is going to be a super gorgeous tailored jacket and one for you to be much proud of. Hats off!

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    1. Awww - thank you for the vote of confidence!

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  2. I still can't believe you've made EIGHT muslins, but it definitely has paid off, I think, as the toile is looking seriously good. I don't see any lines, either drag or drape, that spoil it in any way. The side view shows the fabulous fit over the bust and it's really flattering to your hourglass shape from the front and back view. Well done and good luck with the actual jacket!

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    1. I know. I find it hard to believe too. Thank you so much for your feedback. I really hope this jacket can become a staple.

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  3. I think this looks stunning - what a lovely shape in the first picture. Gertie's done well here once you can get the pattern to fit. I think the sleeve head is brilliant. The last picture is interesting - what an improvement the right side is!

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    1. Thanks Katy! This has been such an intense experience. I can't believe I'm looking forward to bound buttonholes :-)

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  4. it looks so good. worth all of the work. you have more patience than i do for sure.

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    1. Thanks Kelli! I actually have no patience whatsoever. I am, however, exceedingly stubborn :-)

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  5. I think the fit is spot on! I don't see a single thing to change. And I agree with your point about wrinkles. No one wears a piece of clothing standing perfectly still. The minute you move there are going to be wrinkles and drapes. I'm trying to remind myself of this as I work on my jacket.

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    1. It's hard to remember once you get on this fitting treadmill. Egad. Movement is just not conducive to perfect fit!

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  6. Do these pictures of wrinkly sleeves make you feel any better?

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2126855/Princess-Eugenie-attends-Easter-Sunday-church-service-Queen.html

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  7. I think your muslin looks brilliant! I am not just saying that to make you feel better, it really is great. I am so glad you managed to get this far. You should reward yourself.

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    1. Thank you! Maybe I'll reward myself by cutting out a bunch of fashion fabric :-)

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  8. You should be very proud - it is looking fantastic! I agree with you about wrinkles, and photos only seem to enhance them too!

    There are just 2 things I would suggest doing:
    1. Rotate the sleeve forward in the armhole about 1cm, so the grainline of the sleeve is parallel to the natural hang of your upper arm.
    2. The sleeve has a fold extending from the front armhole that could be smoother: Check the front princess line seam at the armhole - when you align the stitching lines, does it form a smooth armhole curve? Check the front armhole curve on the sleeve too, it could need filling in 6-10mm so the curve there is less sharp.

    Hope this helps - apart from these things, I think it is perfect and you deserve another glass of that wine!

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    1. Oh, thank you for this info! I'm going to consider these things tomorrow when I look at the muslin again (before I cut any fashion fabric). xo

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  9. I think it looks really well-fitted and flattering. If it were me, the only thing I would bother changing is the part where your princess seam meets your armhole. If you extend the line a little to be closer to your arm, or just smooth the armhole into a more rounded shape, I think it would allow the sleeve to drape better and would also increase your mobility. But, no one but a seamstress would really notice. Sew that sucker up, it's gorgeous!

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    1. HJ: I think you're saying the same thing that Sherry is saying. I'm going to consider this. Thank you for the feedback!

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  10. I love this princess seamline on you - the right sight looks brilliant! Great job! AND, please do have that Easter wine:)

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    1. Oh, don't worry, I did! :-) Thank you!!

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  11. OMG - break out the Easter chocolate and celebrate! I knew you'd power through, well done. I have zero experience with fitting jackets, but I do have to say that it looks perfect through the body to my untrained eye. I did notice the princess seam meets arm thing that Sherry and Hannah discuss above, but other than that - perfection!

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    1. I'm going to work on that. My fit partner (S) also noticed the same thing. Hopefully it will not be too painful a fix :-)

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  12. The right side is really great, all you need to do is pick part the muslin and use that side as the pattern when you cut the fashion fabric. I am concerned about the right sleeve though in the side view that large wrinkle at the back of your right bicep should not be there. I suspect this is a pattern drafting problem and not and a fit issue, I think there is too much ease at the back of the sleeve piece. One thing to try would be to remove the sleeve and shave off 1/4 inch in that area (have someone mark on the sleeve piece where this wrinkle starts and stops. Then reattach the sleeve and see how it looks. As for 8 muslins - it will be so worth the work trust me. I bet you will make this jacket up at least two more times. Just think how great it will look in a tweed to wear with jeans or in a bright silk with a matching pencil skirt. Fabulous!

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    1. OK, good point. When I address the sleeve thing tomorrow, I will also look at this.

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  13. Have to tell ya, it looks wonderful and you should be soooo proud! Good on you! Give yourself some massive pats on the back. :)

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    1. Isn't it fun after all the misery to find something good at the end of it! I guess this is why we persevere :-)

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  14. What a lovely shape to the jacket enhanced by your wonderful fitting.
    Lois K

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  15. Looks good. I'm glad you didn't give up.

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  16. Wow! A lot of work that paid off. Way to go. Your fashion fabric will make a huge difference. Wool presses and melds much more nicely than stiff muslin. ENJOY.

    I've been known to make dozens of muslins to perfect fit. I get it. Last year I decided I was overfitting everything. I get that too.

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    1. Thanks M! I hope the fashion fabric is going to give the drape I'm hoping for. And I thought of you while I was doing this. I know you have infinite patience for this sort of thing. It's also teaching me lessons about bust fitting that are going to come in so handy when I return to bras...

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  17. Oh it looks awesome! Good for you for not giving up (though I was starting to worry for your health)! It's going to be a beautiful jacket!

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    1. Ha! I was starting to worry too! And I also thought of you while making these muslins. I know you've always had such good outcomes with FBAs. I don't know what my issue is?!

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  18. I think you should be lying on the sofa with wine and chocolate feeling inordinately proud of this. Your perseverance has paid off and this looks amazing.
    I do think it's so easy to overfit; I always forget that a few movement lines are to be expected. They put me in a tailspin until I remember that the garment isn't made of Kevlar and needs to move.
    I cannot wait to see this made up. It's going to look AMAZING.

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    1. I'm doing that right now! Overfitting is definitely a concern here. Mind you, everything is a concern :-) so I'm just keeping on...

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  19. This looks lovely! I can't believe you had the perseverance to stick this out! It really is going to be a fab jacket!

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    1. Thanks Ginger! I hope it's going to be amazing!

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